Federal grants aid Spalding students

Spalding University graduate students, from left, Ashley McDuffee, Laurel Wolfe, Ellie Ott and Elizabeth Gordon listened and took notes during a psychology class Oct. 3. Psychology students will be among those who will collaborate with Restorative Justice Louisville through Spalding’s newly-created Center for Restorative Justice. (Record Photo by Ruby Thomas)

Spalding University graduate students, from left, Ashley McDuffee, Laurel Wolfe, Ellie Ott and Elizabeth Gordon listened and took notes during a psychology class Oct. 3. (Record Photo by Ruby Thomas)

Record Staff Report
First-generation college students and those from “disadvantaged backgrounds” are training to become healthcare professionals at Spalding University thanks to $3.6 million in federal grants.

The university announced the 2016 Scholarship for Disadvantaged Students (SDS) program — funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Health Resources and Services Administration — Oct. 27. Spalding also received these four-year grants in 2012.

The grant money will support 65 to 70 full-time doctoral students in the clinical psychology program and 97 full-time students pursuing masters-level degrees in social work. The scholarships provide at least 50 percent tuition to the recipients, said a press release from the school.

A total of $889,775 in grant money has already been disbursed for the 2016-2017 school year, according to Beth Newberry, the university’s director of media relations.

The scholarships are for students who are “first-generation college students and students from disadvantaged backgrounds who demonstrate financial need and are enrolled in full-time master’s or doctoral-level health programs,” said the release.

The School of Professional Psychology and the School of Social Work — part of the university’s Kosair Charities College of Health and Natural Sciences — have received awards. The grants will allow both schools to recruit and provide academic support to increase the enrollment and retention of full-time students.

These schools will also encourage health-program graduates to practice in “primary care environments within medically under-served communities,” according to the release.

Dr. Tori Murden McClure, president of Spalding University, said “We’re increasing the number of psychologists and social workers in under-served communities through this long-term investment in student scholarships.”

Dr. Steve Katsiskas — chair of the School of Professional Psychology and director of the doctoral program in clinical psychology — said these scholarships will allow students to focus on their studies.

“For students that are financially disadvantaged, this scholarship means that they can focus on their studies and pursue career paths that are in line with their passion to meet the needs of underserved communities,” he said.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *